UG Research Open Positions 11/14/2017
Acoustics and Dynamics  
Faculty Advisor E-mail Project Description Research Area Pay/Credit Last Updated
Dr. A. Ferri al.ferri@me.gatech.edu Shock and Vibration Isolation: 
This project investigates the use of dynamic mounts to reduce the transmission of shock from force inputs to the isolated component. The mounts are composed of spring-mass-damper chains as well as rotating bodies. Students must have knowledge of dynamic systems and Matlab programming.
Acoustics and Dynamics Credit 10/20/2015
Dr. A. Ferri al.ferri@me.gatech.edu Energy Loss in Mobile Vehicles: 
This project investigates the role of compliance and damping in the efficiency of rolling systems such as manual wheelchairs and mobile carts and vehicles.  In particular, the study examines how vibration and flexure of internal components leads to energy loss and inefficiency as the vehicle travels over rough surfaces at different speeds.  Students must have knowledge of dynamic systems and Matlab programming.
Acoustics and Dynamics Credit 10/20/2015
Dr. Cunefare ken.cunefare@me.gatech.edu Noise control in fluid piping systems. Design, fabrication, and testing of noise control devices for use in fluid piping and fluid power systems. Our group has been exploring the use of a unique material in fluid noise control devices, with significant potential for commercial application. The research involves developing and fabricating (or coordinating the fabrication) of devices such as suppressors, fluid resonators and filters. Recent developments may lead to a commercial product. Prefer a two-semester involvement, with the second semester for credit. Desired but not required: Fabrication experience, design CAD/CAE (Solidworks, Inventor, etc.), ME 3180 Acoustics and Dynamics Credit 10/20/2015
Dr. Cunefare ken.cunefare@me.gatech.edu Pressure ripple energy harvester and sensors. "Energy harversters" are devices designed to generate power from non-traditional or diffuse energy sources, such as wind turbulence, ground vibrations, etc. The power produced is intended for low-power sensors and wireless communication nodes. The "pressure ripple" in fluid hydraulic systems represents a potential energy source for an energy harvester. This project will design, fabricate and test prototype energy harvesters as well as energy-harvester-powered sensors and systems targeting fluid hydraulic systems. Prefer a two-semester involvement, with the second semester for credit. Desired but not required:  Fabrication experience, design CAD/CAE (Solidworks, Inventor, etc.), instrumentation, data acquisition, electronics  design and selection. ME 3180, 4189, 4760. Acoustics and Dynamics Credit 10/20/2015
Dr. Cunefare ken.cunefare@me.gatech.edu Removable temporary damping device. Aerospace fabrication often involves riviting and chiseling operations on large metallic structures, which can produce hearing-damage levels of noise. This project will explore design and fabrication of removable temporary damping measures for such structures,exploiting the concept of shot mass dampers. Prefer a two-semester involvement, with the second semester for credit. Desired but not required:  Fabrication experience (3D printing), design CAD/CAE (Solidworks, Inventor, etc.), ME 3180, 4189. Instrumentation, data acquisition.  Acoustics and Dynamics Credit 10/20/2015
Dr. Cunefare ken.cunefare@me.gatech.edu Novel water hammer control device. Modeling, design, fabrication, and testing of novel water-hammer control device. Our group has been exploring the use of a unique material in fluid noise control devices, with an extension to the control of water hammer in plumbing systems. The research involves developing and fabricating (or coordinating the fabrication) of a prototype water hammer arrestor based on the use of the new material. Prefer a two-semester involvement, with the second semester for credit. Desired but not required:  Fabrication experience (3D printing), design CAD/CAE (Solidworks, Inventor, etc.), ME 3180, 4189. Instrumentation, data acquisition. Acoustics and Dynamics Credit 10/20/2015
Dr. Cunefare ken.cunefare@me.gatech.edu GT Motor Sports/GT Off-Road. Projects related to SAE competition teams. Must be an active member of either GTMS or GTOR. Acoustics and Dynamics Credit 4/3/2016
Dr. K. Sabra karim.sabra@me.gatech.edu Underwater Acoustic tags for high-frequency side-scan sonars.
Developing Acoustic tags could be beneficial to identify and mark underwater targets or tracks of interests to navigate autonomous underwater vehicles and marine robots. Such  acoustics tags could then be read by side-scan sonars , similarly to what’s commonly done using black and white optical bar codes with laser scanner at the check-out counter of retail stores. To do so, various  physical mechanism to design acoustic contrast will be investigated and quantified for high-frequency acoustics (f~100kHz). Finally Acoustic tags will be designed in the machine shop and tested in the ME underwater tank facility. 
Acoustics and Dynamics Credit 8/18/2017
Dr. K. Sabra karim.sabra@me.gatech.edu Assessing the stiffness of the Achille’s tendon using laser vibrometry.
Achille’s tendon is known to be prone to injury; and it has been recognized in the medical community that proper diagnosis  and prediction of these injuries could be improved by better characterizing the mechanical integrity of the Achille’s tendon (as it is done by monitoring the cables of a suspended bridge to prevent catastrophic failure). Hence, the objective for this research is to investigate the  mechanical properties of the Achille’s tendon using a vibration-based elastography technique.  This elastography technique relies on generating vibrations into the tendon and measuring the velocity and amplitude of these vibrations while they propagate along the tendon using a single scanning laser vibrometer. The project involves  a significant experimental component and you’ll be trained on using all software and hardware used in our lab. 
Acoustics and Dynamics Credit 8/18/2017
Dr. Michael Leamy michael.leamy@me.gatech.edu Build a prototype of a nonlinear acoustic metamaterial using 3D printing. 
Acoustic metamaterials are man-made materials composed of periodically repeating structures.  This research is interested in studying large amplitude waves to uncover nonlinearities and frequency dead zones.  The project will entail designing and printing small structures, assembling them into periodic materials, and then testing their frequency response using electrodynamic shakers, laser vibrometers, and LabView-based data acquisition.
Acoustics and Dynamics Credit 7/31/2015
Dr. Michael Leamy michael.leamy@me.gatech.edu Exploration of Hybrid Dynamical Systems Using Matlab
Undergraduates with a strong interest in applying Matlab skills are sought to study dynamical systems.  The research will entail using numerical methods to explore how impact energy can be harvested using electromechanical means.  The research student will translate equations of motion, developed during an NSF-funded research project, into Matlab code to be numerically integrated using standard Matlab solvers.  The student will then explore results of the numerical integration using scientific visualization tools, such as Poincare maps and bifurcation diagrams.  No prior experience with such tools is necessary – the student will learn this exciting new area of analysis.
Acoustics and Dynamics Credit 8/15/2015
Dr. Michael Leamy michael.leamy@me.gatech.edu This research sets out to build an experimental setup for achieving unidirectional edge waves in an electro-elastic lattice. The basic design and components for the system have already been specified by a PhD student.  The undergraduate would assist in building and testing the apparatus, and potentially writing some Matlab codes to analyze the results. Anticipating good results, the undergraduate is anticipated to co-author a research paper on the topic. The project is for 3 hour credits (non-pay). A student with 3rd or 4th year status and a good GPA is desired. Acoustics and Dynamics Credit 8/23/2017
Dr C. Arvanitis costas.arvanitis@gatech.edu  Mathematical modelling of acoustic cavitation in vascular networks
One of the challenges to the treatment of brain cancer is the limited delivery of therapeutics across the Blood Brain Barrier (BBB). Focused ultrasound (FUS) combined with microbubbles provides a method to disturb the BBB and therefore promote drug delivery. Despite early promising results, there is a lack of fundamental understanding of the impact of this method on the transport of anticancer agents into the brain interstitium. To this end, we want to develop a multiphysics model to simulate the interaction of acoustic cavitation with vessels and its impact on the transport of drugs across the vessels of brain tumors. The student will gain experience on building a model based on finite element method using the software COMSOL and get deeper understanding of acoustic cavitation and of the transport of molecules in biological systems.
Acoustics and Dynamics Credit 3/27/2017
Dr C. Arvanitis costas.arvanitis@gatech.edu  Mapping and Characterization of Acoustic Cavitation
Ultrasound-stimulated microbubble oscillations have several promising applications for non-invasive therapies. This project will focus on calibration, refinement, and operation of an experimental apparatus for passive mapping of microbubble oscillations, as well as characterization of acoustic cavitation using the recorded acoustic emissions and numerical modeling. The student will gain experience on building experimental apparatus and get deeper understanding of acoustic cavitation and passive acoustic mapping. Required: Knowledge of MATLAB. Desired: Experience with fabrication (3D printing); Design CAD/CAE (e.g., Solidworks); Instrumentation and data acquisition
Acoustics and Dynamics Credit 3/27/2017
Dr. J. Meaud julien.meaud@me.gatech.edu Exploring mechanics of chinchilla middle ear via lumped parameter model
The middle ear is comprised of joints, ligaments, and three small bones. Previously, our group has modeled the chinchilla middle ear using a lumped parameter model (Lemons & Meaud 2016). This model was tuned to published experimental data. Recently, new experimental data published from same group; aspects of the data are quite different than the previous data. The authors speculate that the differences observed in data might be due to natural variation of the middle ears of chinchillas. In this project, the parameters of our chinchilla model will be re-tuned to new experimental data. The variation of the mechanical parameters will be compared to the variation of parameters reported for other species. This project requires prior experience with MATLAB programming.
Acoustics and Dynamics Credit 8/23/2017
Automation and Robotics
Faculty Advisor E-mail Project Description Automation and Robotics    
Dr. B. Bras bert.bras@me.gatech.edu With the advent of autonomous vehicles, there is also a need for addressing how to refuel and/or recharge an autonomous  vehicle when no human is present in the car. In this project, the focus is on refining an existing hands-free autonomous plug- in hybrid electric vehicle  (PHEV) charging system that is capable of inserting a standard Electric Vehicle Supply  Equipment (EVSE) charging plug into the vehicle’s charging socket in order to make it more robust and bring it closer to commercialization.The challenge is to devise a system that can align, insert, and retract a standard EVSE charging plug into a standard  (PH)EV charger port. In this project, the objective is to do further refinementon the existing design and prototype, with the goal of making the prototype and design more robust and bring it closer to commercialization.Specifically, the project in Spring 2017 will focus on: Higher range of motion, including some angular motion, Better way of opening and closing charge ports on the vehicle, Designing for outdoor deployment (current prototype was intended for indoor garage use). The outcome will be a working prototype that can be demonstrated at an upcoming automotive technology show in  Summer 2017. Funds will be available for materials and supplies to construct prototype(s). Students interested in working on this project should contact Dr. Bert Bras Experience with mechatronics, automation,  controls,  and/or vision systems is required. Students will be working in a team and have weekly meetings with Dr. Bras and (potentially) technical contacts at a major automotive company. Automation and Robotics Credit 1/11/2017
Dr. A. Young kbhakta3@gatech.edu The Exoskeleton and Prosthetic Intelligent Controls (EPIC) lab directed by Dr. Aaron Young is looking for undergraduate students interested in performing research in the field of robotics and controls, specifically in the area of powered lower limb prostheses. The current project involves creating a user independent control system in a powered knee and ankle prosthetic device to allow persons with transfemoral amputation to improve their ambulation in common community tasks. The goals for the Spring of 2017 include finishing the design and building of the device, creating several control algorithms, and be able to perform preliminary testing. One essential skill that is required is training in machining as the project will require significant machining of prosthetic componentry. Other useful skills that would be of value include programming in Matlab and experience with mechatronics. If you are interested in performing research in the spring, please contact Krishan Bhakta at kbhakta3@gatech.edu with your name, year, and resume. Automation and Robotics Credit 11/28/2016
Dr. Y.-H. Chen ye-hwa.chen@me.gatech.edu Apply fuzzy set theory to Newtonian mechanics.
We will seek the formulation of dynamic problems when the system's parameters and initial conditions are uncertain, which can only be described by fuzzy set theory
Automation and Robotics Credit 10/20/2015
Dr. Aaron Young kbhakta3@gatech.edu The Exoskeleton and Prosthetic Intelligent Controls (EPIC) lab is looking for undergraduate students interested in performing research in the field of robotics and controls. The current project involves creating a user independent system in a powered knee and ankle prosthetic device to allow persons with transfemoral amputation to improve their ambulation in common community tasks. The goals for the summer of 2017 include finalization of electronic integration onto the prosthetic and human-subject testing. Skills that will be looked at include programming skills (C & Python), mechatronics (circuit design & electronic configuration), and data analysis skills (MATLAB). If you are interested in performing research in the summer, please contact Krishan Bhakta at kbhakta3@gatech.edu with your name, year, and resume. Automation and Robotics Credit 3/16/2017
Dr. Martial Taillefert martial.taillefert@eas.gatech.edu NSF-funded project to upgrade and deploy Underwater Autonomous Vehicles (UAVs) in the ocean. UG researchers sought who can design and build a water sampling probe to collect small water samples from the seafloor. Automation and Robotics Credit 10/20/2015
           
Bioengineering
Faculty Advisor E-mail Project Description Bioengineering    
Dr. Ethier sschwaner3@gatech.edu Finite element modeling of rat and monkey posterior eye biomechanics
Motivation: Glaucoma is the second leading cause of blindness in the world, and is strongly linked with ocular biomechanics. However, the biomechanics of the eye (specifically the optic nerve head) are difficult to study due to complex tissue architecture, therefore the exact link between ocular biomechanics and progression of blindness in glaucoma is not well understood. Our lab uses finite element analysis to characterize these biomechanics with the goal of better understanding their link to blindness progression.
Project Summary: Students will learn how to use 4 software programs (Multiview – custom software for viewing 3D reconstructions of eye anatomy, Rhino – a CAD program with considerable surface-fitting capabilities for deriving geometric information from point cloud data, Trellis – finite element analysis pre-processing software, Abaqus – one of the leading commercial finite element programs) in order to create finite element models of rat and monkey optic nerve heads.
Required Qualities: A strong interest in biomechanics and modeling work. Strong preference will be given to students interested in at least 2 consecutive semesters of research on this project (Summer and Fall) with potential for 3-4 semesters of work.
Helpful Qualities: Basic understanding of Solid Mechanics. Previous experience with CAD programs. The ability to work in an organized and efficient manner.
Bioengineering Credit 4/11/2016
Dr. Forest craig.forest@me.gatech.edu The Precision Biosystems Laboratory develops precision instruments for high throughput genetic sensing, and tests them on patient samples as medical devices in hospitals or research labs.  Many of our students are ME's because these instruments require machine design, manufacturing, and microfabrication tools to create.  We also often utilize optics (such as microscopes and lasers) in their design to make these biological measurements.   The ideal candidate will have some experience building things (especially microfabrication experience), will know or be interested in learning some molecular biology and optics, and will have initiative and independence. Graduates from our lab are well suited to careers in bioinstrumentation design in academia and industry. Bioengineering Credit 10/20/2015
Dr. Stephen Sprigle stephen.sprigle@design.gatech.edu Description: The overall project involves the monitoring of wheelchair use during everyday life, specifically the use of powered wheelchairs with a seat elevator. This undergraduate project focusses on the instrumentation used to monitor wheelchair use. The student will be involved in the fabrication of seat sensors and the overall testing of the data acquisition system. The seat sensors are fabricated using force sensors which interface with a data logger. Additional sensors are used to monitor seat elevation and wheel velocity. Mounting and testing the data logging system is needed to insure valid and repeatable results. This will be accomplished using controlled testing before the system is tested in the real world.  The student should be comfortable with sensors and data acquisition instrumentation as well as possessing basic hand skills using tools. Collecting and synthesizing data will also be a focus. Ample mentoring will be available for all aspects of the project
 
Bioengineering Credit or Pay 9/1/2016
Dr. Sonenblum ss427@gatech.edu Development of a wheelchair cushion shape compliance test:
This project will develop a standardized, laboratory test for evaluating the performance of wheelchair cushions. Work will include fabrication of phantom buttocks, use of a materials testing machine, and the development of appropriate sensors and/or imaging techniques to measure 3D deformation of the phantom.
Bioengineering Credit or Pay 1/3/2017
Dr. Sonenblum ss427@gatech.edu MRI image processing and measurement of tissue compliance: The overall project is aimed at identifying clinical measurements to help personalize pressure injury risk in individuals who use wheelchairs. This undergraduate project focuses on using MRI image processing to compute tissue deformation in the seated buttocks. We will use medical imaging software as well as custom Matlab scripts. Matlab skills are preferred but not required. Must have an interest in learning some anatomy.  Bioengineering Credit or Pay 1/3/2017
Dr. Sonenblum ss427@gatech.edu Real world monitoring of in-seat movement: This project is focused on relating in-seat movement to health outcomes for full-time wheelchair users. Data has been collected on 40 wheelchair users and a student will focus on data processing. This includes using classification techniques to characterize the in-seat movement. Matlab skills and attention to detail are a must for this project Bioengineering Credit or Pay 1/3/2017
Dr. Sulchek todd.sulchek@me.gatech.edu Atomic force microscopy and microfluidics for biomechanical cell identification and sorting.
We use afm to measure the mechanical properties of cells, then use microfluidics to sort cells by stiffness to remove them from healthy cells. More info can be found:
AFM:
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0046609
Microfluidics
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0075901
 
Bioengineering Credit 10/20/2015
Dr. Sulchek todd.sulchek@me.gatech.edu Measurement of nanoscale interaction potentials with Atomic Force Microscopy
Project description: Nanoscale imaging and force measurement will be conducted to improve materials and biomedical sciences. Specific innovations that will be focused upon include: ultra-high resolution imaging of materials; high-rate data acquisition and processing to perform nanoscale measurements and manipulation; and cell adhesion/mechanics measurements.
http://scitation.aip.org/content/aip/journal/rsi/83/2/10.1063/1.3683236
 
Bioengineering Credit 10/20/2015
Dr. T Kim ytkim@gatech.edu Microfluidic control system.
The objective of this project is to develop high precision pressure control system for biomimetic microsystem engineering.
Bioengineering Credit 10/20/2015
Dr. T Kim ytkim@gatech.edu Organ-on-a-chip:
The object of this project is to develop biomimetic microsystems that recapitulate the structure and function of human organs.
Bioengineering Credit 10/20/2015
Dr. T Kim ytkim@gatech.edu Microfluidic assembly of multifunction nano materials:  The object of this project is to develop microfluidic modules that allows continuous production of multicomponent nano materials with high reproducibility. Bioengineering Credit 10/20/2015
Dr. S. Thomas susan.thomas@gatech.edu The Thomas laboratory studies the role of fluid transport phenomena in regulating the dynamics and kinetics of cellular and molecular transport processes.
For this project, we are interested in studying how signaling molecules expressed by cells in tissues have access to blood or lymphatic vessels. We plan to study how pressure across the vascular wall, flow rate, and solute size influence the transport of these cells. The results of these studies will aid in the investigation of cancer metastasis, immune cell homing, and drug delivery. Specifically, this work entails applying the multiphysics modeling software COMSOL to multiple studies in the lab, allowing for manipulation of parameters and prediction of outcomes to further aid the lab’s research.

Objectives and Goals
-       Model and study solute gradient in single-channel flow chamber
-       Analyze data to determine maximum solute gradient in single-channel flow
-       Model a two-channel device separated by a porous membrane
-       Perform studies with various combinations of pressure and flow parameters to analyze effects on solute transport
Bioengineering Credit 3/29/2016
Dr. D. Ku david.ku@me.gatech.edu Medical Device Design
Thrombus formation and its resulting complications are a widespread and deleterious problem in current blood-contacting devices (e.g. stents, catheters, heart valves, ECMO, VADs). Currently, it is difficult to predict when and where clots will form in a given device. This is largely due to the complicated interactions of the driving processes of thrombosis: material surface adsorption and hemodynamics. The project objectives are: 1) to develop in vitro systems with clinically relevant endpoints to assess thrombogenicity of medical devices, 2) redesign current issues in medical devices, and 3) broaden the understanding of the overall mechanism. Student candidates should preferably have a background in fluid mechanics and a strong interest in biology and device design. 
Bioengineering Credit 3/27/2017
Dr. D. Ku david.ku@me.gatech.edu Create a medical diagnostic device to predict the likelihood of heart attack and stroke.
Project Background: Heart attacks and strokes stem from a narrowing of the arterial lumen that leads to occlusive blood clots. Currently, there are almost no assays that test for platelet thrombosis under pathologic conditions of high shear rate, endpoint of occlusive thrombosis, and low blood volume. Such a device would be beneficial in developing individualized anti-platelet therapies in the clinic, as well as in experimental benchtop assessments of novel interventions in preventing occlusive thrombosis. Therefore, a custom microfluidic chip was manufactured to perform such an assessment.
Project Summary: The overall project involves creating of a medical diagnostic device to predict the likelihood of heart attack and stroke. The quantification of blood occlusion times under high shear flow conditions within a custom microfluidic chip. Students will learn experimental techniques for microfluidic blood assays utilized in the laboratory. Experiments will involve quantification of the sources of variability within high shear microfluidic thrombosis assays in order to determine conditions for reducing intra-sample variability.
Required Qualities: Ability to work with blood. Ability to work independently on the planned microfluidic experiments on Monday and Wednesday mornings from 8:00 AM to 12:00 PM. Strong preference will be given to students who can commit to at least 2 consecutive semesters of work, with potential for additional semesters afterward.
Helpful Qualities: Previous laboratory experience. Basic understanding of MATLAB. 
Bioengineering Credit 3/27/2017
Dr. W. Hong Yeo whyeo@gatech.edu Soft, Wearable Heart Monitor In this project, we design a wearable, unobtrusive, multifunctional health monitoring system based on skin-like nanomaterials named ‘SKINTRONICS’. The device consists of a wireless telemetry (Bluetooth) component, nanomembrane circuit interconnects, and miniaturized chip components for multiple sensors. This device employs an ECG with wired electrodes for cardiac health monitoring as well as an accelerometer, gyroscope, and magenetometer for physical activity recognition and fall detection.  While ECG monitoring and fall detection were chosen for this project, the multifunctionality of the SKINTRONICS device possesses the versatility to incorporate many other types of biological sensors creating an unobtrusive, skin-conformable health monitoring method for an array of applications. Bioengineering Credit 8/18/2017
Dr. W. Hong Yeo whyeo@gatech.edu Wireless, Intraoral Hybrid Electronics  We introduce a stretchable hybrid electronic system that has an exceptionally small form factor, enabling an active, long-range wireless monitoring of sodium intake. Computational study of flexible mechanics and soft materials provides fundamental aspects of key design factors for a tissue-friendly configuration, incorporating a stretchable circuit and microstructured sensor. Analytical calculation and experimental study enables reliable wireless circuitry that accommodates dynamic mechanical stress. Systematic in vitro modeling characterizes the functionality of a membrane sodium sensor in the electronics. In vivo demonstration with human subjects captures the device feasibility for real-time, wireless quantification of sodium intake, which can be used to manage hypertension and diabetes.  Bioengineering Credit 8/18/2017
Dr. W. Hong Yeo whyeo@gatech.edu Implantable, Nanomembrane Flow-Diverter  We introduce an ultra-stretchable, implantable system that integrates a hemocompatible flow-sensor for quantification of intra-aneurysmal hemodynamics. The open-mesh, membrane device is capable of effective implantation in the complex neurovascular vessel with extreme stretchability and bendability for monitoring of a treatment progress. A collection of quantitative mechanics, fluid dynamics, and experimental studies establishes the fundamental aspects of design criteria for a highly compliant, implantable device. Hemocompatibility study using a human blood captures the device feasibility for long-term insertion in a blood vessel. In vitro demonstrations of three types of flow sensors, made of biocompatible materials, show quantification of intra-aneurysmal blood flow in a pig aorta and the capability of observation of aneurysm treatment. Bioengineering Credit 8/18/2017
CAE and Design      
Faculty Advisor E-mail Project Description      
Dr. B. Bras bert.bras@me.gatech.edu Evaluating manufacturing systems performance using biological metrics CAE and Design Credit 10/20/2015
Dr. S. Sitaraman suresh.sitaraman@me.gatech.edu Photovoltaic Module Reliability
This work will focus on reliability of photo-voltaic modules when placed in outdoor environment or when subjected to accelerated stress testing
CAE and Design Credit or Pay 10/20/2015
Dr. S. Sitaraman suresh.sitaraman@me.gatech.edu Flexible Electronics
This project will examine the reliability of flexible “skin-like” electronic structures by bending and stretching
CAE and Design Credit or Pay 10/20/2015
Dr. S. Sitaraman suresh.sitaraman@me.gatech.edu Mechanical Characterization of Electroplated Copper:
This work will focus on mechanical characterization of electroplated thin copper films.  Lithography patterned copper films of various shapes and dimensions will be employed in this study.
CAE and Design Pay 10/20/2015
Dr. S. Sitaraman suresh.sitaraman@me.gatech.edu Interfacial Delamination:
This project will focus on studying delamination for metal/polymer and metal/SiO2 interfaces through experiments under temperature and humidity conditions.  
CAE and Design Credit 10/20/2015
Dr. S. Sitaraman suresh.sitaraman@me.gatech.edu Solar Energy:
The objective of this project is to develop a desk-top model paved with solar panels to simulate and study large-area solar energy harvesting for next-generation transportation needs.  This is a hands-on project.
CAE and Design Credit 10/20/2015
Dr. S. Sitaraman suresh.sitaraman@me.gatech.edu Compliant Interconnect Design:
The objective of this project is to examine different compliant interconnect designs through numerical simulations.   Mechanical and electrical behavior of compliant interconnects will be studied.  If the student has cleanroom experience, fabrication of micro-scale compliant interconnect geometries will also be pursued.
CAE and Design Credit 10/20/2015
Dr. Yan Wang yan.wang@me.gatech.edu Process design and optimization for additive manufacturing/3D printing (advanced materials, CAD, simulation at multiple length scales, data analytics). CAE and Design Pay or Credit 10/20/2015
Dr. Yan Wang yan.wang@me.gatech.edu Heart Valve Design:
Apply engineering design methodology (modeling, simulation, and optimization) to the design of Transcatheter Aortic Valve to treat heart disease.
CAE and Design Credit 9/1/2016
Dr. A. Jariwala amit.jariwala@gatech.edu The objective of this project is to design and assemble a next generation Exposure Controlled Projection Lithography (ECPL) system to fabricate micro-optic devices. ECPL is an additive manufacturing process based on the principle of stereolithography. Past researchers have developed a prototype system hardware for fabrication and real-time live monitoring. The primary challenge is to further refine the system to enhance its overall performance. This is a hands-on project which will require basic understanding of optics and lasers. Tasks include researching into optical systems, assembling system hardware, conducing experiments, etc. Students will have an excellent opportunity to interact and learn from a team of scientists and engineers from a GT startup company which is commercializing the technology. CAE and Design Credit 8/15/2015
Dr. Julie Linsey julie.linsey@me.gatech.edu Persketchtivity/Sketching: Innovation, Design Reasoning, Engineering Education and Method Lab
The undergraduate student will be advised by Dr. Linsey as they investigate the importance of sketching abilities in engineering design. The undergraduate student will assist graduate students in the running of experiments aimed to see how different methods of teaching sketching to engineering students affects their abilities to learn to sketch effectively. The student will assist in the analysis of data collected through surveys and interviews of participants in the study. The student will also perform a review of past works to see how the engineering design community has addressed the issue of sketching in previously published studies. This assignment will require the undergraduate student to work in close proximity to Dr. Linsey’s graduates assistant which will allow for personal mentoring and growth.
CAE and Design Pay or Credit 8/15/2015
Dr. Julie Linsey julie.linsey@me.gatech.edu Innovation, Design Reasoning, Engineering Education and Method Lab
Undergraduate research opportunity with the IDREEM Lab. Students will have the opportunity to bolster skills in independent research as well as working as part of a team. Students will be doing work in human-based design research. Tasks for the students will include data collection and analysis, literature review, metric design and evaluation and pilot studies where the students can guide their own related research based on their analysis.
CAE and Design Pay or Credit 8/15/2015
Dr. Roxanne Moore roxanne.moore@gatech.edu Engineering Education and K-12 STEM Education
The goal of this research is to better understand the impacts of K-12 engineering programs on students and teachers.  Dr. Moore and her collaborators at the Center for Education Integrating Science, Mathematics, and Computing (CEISMC) work on multiple research projects and outreach programs.  Depending on interests, there are currently undergraduate research opportunities in the following areas:
1. Understanding the impacts of the K-12 InVenture Challenge based on data collected from 3 years of implementation in a variety of schools.  Position would involve cleaning and mining data to look for correlations and building representing those data in meaningful ways.
2. Middle school students' understanding of the engineering design process as evidenced by electronic design logs. Position would involve scoring middle school students' design logs using already established rubrics to look for evidence of learning and improvement over time.
3. Modeling K-12 schools using complex systems theory.  This opportunity involves both quantitative data synthesis for simulations and/or qualitative data analysis from previously conducted interviews. 
CAE and Design Credit 7/18/2017
Dr. R. Pucha raghuram.pucha@me.gatech.edu Manufacturing of advanced composites with nanofillers needs upfront computational tools for application specific analysis and characterization.
This research involves developing representative volume element-based three-dimensional models with various nanofiller geometries and process parameters for the design and analysis of composite materials. Analytical, computer-aided design(CAD), and computer-aided engineering (CAE) tools are integrated to develop user interface tools with automated three-dimensional models for mechanical and electrical analyses. Various process parameters in the manufacture of nanocomposites are quantified using image analysis techniques. Efficient algorithms are incorporated in developing a three-dimensional network of fillers within matrix representative volume element to account for filler–filler interactions and compatibility. Continuum-level  stress–strain behavior of nanocomposites, the effective modulus, and the electrical conductivity of polymer nanocomposite fibers are analyzed. An  automated design and analysis framework  in  this research integrates various software tools, quantifies the effect of process parameters of experimental composites with nanofillers, and provides quick what-if analysis for manufacturing application-specific composites.
CAE and Design Credit 3/29/2016
Dr. Cassandra Telenko cassandra.telenko@me.gatech.edu Sustainable User Behavior
Modern designs are only beginning to address the connection between user operation and environmental or energy performance. For example, Ford recently patented their Smartgauge EcoGuide to provide real-time feedback on fuel efficiency. Feedback systems are only a small part of this solution.  Students engaged in this project would find examples of design approaches and data on their effectiveness, design and build prototypes for pilot studies, design and manage pilot studies for future work. (Manufacturing, fabrication, CAD, and electronics skills would be very helpful)
CAE and Design Credit 8/15/2015
Dr. Cassandra Telenko cassandra.telenko@me.gatech.edu Design for Environment Software Tools
Many companies are looking to integrate environmentally friendly design into their product development process but are often frustrated by the lack of guidance provided by existing tools. We propose to create a pro-active advisory tool for CAD systems that integrates design for environment guidelines to suggest design strategies at key points in the design process. The objective of the project is to create an AutoDesk CAD extension for examining designs at various stages and finding design for environment strategies. Many commercial design firms would be interested in this product for aiding in tasks from concept to embodiment design. Students would work with AutoDesk Forge staff to develop the extensions. Looking for multiple students with either design skills (ideally ME or ID) or programming skills (ideally CS minors or majors) or both.
CAE and Design Pay or Credit 4/6/2017
Dr. Cassandra Telenko cassandra.telenko@me.gatech.edu Analyze environmental impacts of usage of Invention studio 3d printers CAE and Design Credit 1/1/2015
Dr. R. Jaio rjiao@gatech.edu System modeling and simulation: The student will work with graduate students to learn and practise process modeling tools and discrete event simulation software Simio. CAE and Design Credit 9/23/2017
Dr. R. Jaio rjiao@gatech.edu Energy usage modeling and analysis in manufacturing processes: A collaborative research with graduate student to learn techniques and methods for energy-aware manufacturing systems design, planning and optmization.   CAE and Design Credit 9/23/2017
Dr. R. Jaio rjiao@gatech.edu Data-enabled design analytics: A collaborative research with graduate student to study large data analysis techniques and knowledge mining and learning in engineering design. CAE and Design Credit 9/23/2017
Fluid Mechanics, Heat Transfer, Combustion, and Energy Systems      
Faculty Advisor E-mail Project Description      
Dr. D. Hu hu@me.gatech.edu Fluid mechanics of the digestive system Fluid Mechanics Credit 7/31/2015
Dr. D. Hu hu@me.gatech.edu Dynamics of fire ant self-assemblages Fluid Mechanics Credit 7/31/2015
Dr. D. Hu hu@me.gatech.edu Measuring the Young’s Modulus of Fire Ant Aggregations
Fire ants form rafts as a response to flooding. The raft is made entirely of ants. As a result the structure is constantly moving and adjusting yet is still able to support applied forces. We are investigating the material properties of the raft. This study will look at the Young’s modulus and Poisson ratio of the fire ant aggregation.
Fluid Mechanics Credit 7/31/2015
Dr. D. Hu ablee@gatech.edu  Bubble-based sniffing for underwater machine olfaction
Star-nosed moles can sniff out prey underwater by rapidly blowing and inhaling bubbles. Bubble-based sniffing inspires a novel approach to chemical sensing that does not expose the sensor to harmful seawater. This project aims to better understand the role of the mole’s star structure in bubble-based sniffing and use this insight to develop an electronic nose, capable of underwater chemical sensing. The ideal candidate would be a Junior or Senior with some fluid mechanics knowledge and experience working in the machine shop. If interested, please send your resume to Alex Lee at ablee@gatech.edu to apply. 
Fluid Mechanics Credit 8/22/2017
Dr. Andrei Fedorov andrei.fedorov@me.gatech.edu The goal of this project is to develop a microfluidic package and experimental characterization of the thermal-hydraulic performance of a two-phase cooling system for thermal management of high heat flux electronics. Required Qualities: Ability to work independently, Completed ME 3340 and 3345. This is a hands-on project, so experience with ME Machine shop, Invention Studio, LabView, or other prior research experience is preferred. Heat Transfer, Combustion,
and Energy Systems
Credit 10/20/2015
Dr. Andrei Fedorov andrei.fedorov@me.gatech.edu Distributed Hydrogen Generation from Natural Gas Using Novel Sorption-Enhanced Variable-Volume Batch-Membrane Reactor
Description. The goal of this project is to experimentally characterize performance and to expand the capabilities of the novel catalytic reactor invented at Georgia Tech for distributed hydrogen generation from natural gas, with possibility for on-site CO2 capture. Operation of the existing laboratory reactor testbed, including process automation and data acquisition using LabView, will have to be mastered first, followed by introducing and testing enhancements of the reactor to improve performance. Collaboration with material scientists from overseas is also planned to enrich research experience.
Required Qualities: Ability to work independently. Completed ME 3322, 3340 and 3345. This is a hands-on project, so experience with ME Machine shop, Invention Studio, LabView, or other prior research experience is preferred. Strong preference will be given to students interested in at least 2 consecutive semesters of research experience with this project (Fall and Spring).
Background and Motivation: Although abundant petroleum and coal have enabled the production of affordable primary power and transportation fuels over the past century, the recent emergence of natural gas as a significant fossil fuel resource has dramatically changed the energy landscape. With its favorable hydrogen-to-carbon ratio, coupled with recently developed techniques to tap substantial reserves that were previously not economically viable, natural gas has been identified by many as a bridge fuel to a low-carbon energy future and as a potential means to create alternative transport fuels. To make full use of this promising resource, new chemical conversion processes that are optimized for natural gas feedstock must be developed. A process that can efficiently produce hydrogen in a distributed fashion by steam reforming of natural gas is one such technology that would have a far-reaching impact, as it could eliminate the requirement for a large-scale hydrogen delivery infrastructure and aid the acceptance of hydrogen-powered technology by society.
Heat Transfer, Combustion,
and Energy Systems
Credit 8/15/2015
Dr. Caroline Genzale caroline.genzale@me.gatech.edu A range of experimental and computational projects are available each semester to support research on clean diesel and gasoline combustion engines, fuel injection and spray atomization, and alternative fuels.  Please check www.spherelab.gatech.edu for the most current listing of available opportunities. Heat Transfer, Combustion,
and Energy Systems
Credit 10/20/2015
Dr. Garimella srinivas.garimella@me.gatech.edu Computational Fluid Dynamics Study on Flow Distribution in Heat Exchanger Headers
The goal of this project is to develop a computational fluid dynamics model for flow in a heat exchanger header.  The model will be verified using experimental data that has been gathered previously.  Initially, a single-phase CFD model will be developed, with the possibility of extending the project to include gas-liquid flows through header systems.
Heat Transfer, Combustion,
and Energy Systems
Pay or Credit 10/20/2015
Dr. Garimella srinivas.garimella@me.gatech.edu The Effects of Two-Phase Flow Maldistribution in Heat and Mass Exchangers
In this project, a student will create a detailed heat exchanger model to quantify the effects of flow maldistribution in different types of heat exchangers.  The high heat transfer coefficients and compact sizes of minichannel heat exchangers have become increasingly important in the development of efficient, inexpensive and compact energy systems.  In many cases, however, these systems do not perform as well as models predict due to flow maldistribution.  No prior coding experience is needed, but a fundamental understanding of heat transfer is required.
Heat Transfer, Combustion,
and Energy Systems
Pay or Credit 10/20/2015
Dr. Garimella srinivas.garimella@me.gatech.edu Optimization of Heat Recovery Refrigerant Generator (HRRG)
This project seeks to optimize the design of a novel heat exchanger concept used to recover heat from an exhaust gas stream. A formulation of the optimization problem given global design parameters and constraints will be developed. Numerical simulations will be developed to in COMSOL, MATLAB and EES to study the effect of various design parameters on overall component performance. The goal is to develop a refined and detailed design solution that adequately addresses a common set of constraints.
Heat Transfer, Combustion,
and Energy Systems
Pay or Credit 10/20/2015
Dr. Garimella srinivas.garimella@me.gatech.edu Transient Modeling of Binary-Fluid Mixtures
This project seeks to accurately model binary-fluid mixture heat and mass transfer characteristics in heat exchangers using a finite volume method.  The model will determine the time evolution of heat exchanger performance and will enable a detailed understanding of the components in a complete system.  This effort can be extended to a full system analysis by integrating different components based on the same framework.  The project will require good familiarity with using MATLAB, and some experience with iterative solvers or programing in general.
Heat Transfer, Combustion,
and Energy Systems
Pay or Credit 10/20/2015
Dr. Garimella srinivas.garimella@me.gatech.edu Computational Fluid Dynamics Study on Heat Exchanger Distributors
As various electronic and thermal devices get more compact, it has become essential to reject the same amount of heat in smaller areas. Microchannels have been shown to increase heat transfer coefficients compared to conventional designs. Additionally, the implementation of microchannels has been shown to significantly reduce the size of conventional heat exchangers. Unfortunately the impact of these microchannels have been limited by the maldistribution of the fluids among then. A typical microchannel heat exchanger consists of 50-100 parallel microchannels. The project will involve doing a CFD study to develop new distributors to improve flow distribution using ANSYS and FLUENT. 
Heat Transfer, Combustion,
and Energy Systems
Pay or Credit 10/20/2015
Dr. Ghiaasiaan mghiaasiaan@gatech.edu  The objective of this project is to design and optimize cryogenic distillation systems for the purification of liquefied natural gas (LNG). 
Natural gas that is extracted from reservoirs typically contains undesirable constituents which must be reduced in concentration. The design process involves extensive computer simulations.  ME 3322 and ME 3340 are prerequisites, and ME 3345 will be preferred but not required.
Heat Transfer, Combustion,
and Energy Systems
Credit 1/12/2015
Dr. Ghiaasiaan mghiaasiaan@gatech.edu The objective of this project is to experimentally study the flow and heat transfer in a heat exchanger that includes helically coiled tubes. 
The experiments are performed using an existing test facility, which may need modifications for added instrumentation.  The experiments include tests with room temperature water and air, as well as cryogenic (liquid nitrogen) fluids.  The student should have taken ME 3322; It is also preferred (but not required) that the student has taken ME 3340 and ME 3345 previously.   
Heat Transfer, Combustion,
and Energy Systems
Credit 1/12/2015
Dr. Hatzell marta.hatzell@me.gatech.edu Design and fabrication of large bench scale deionization device.
Students will need to review the current state of the art, in terms of design of deionization devices. Then students will design the device using solidworks. Fluid dynamics and electrochemical simulations will be characterized using COMSOL Multiphysics. 
Heat Transfer, Combustion,
and Energy Systems
Credit 10/27/2016
Dr. Hatzell marta.hatzell@me.gatech.edu Energy and Exergy Analyses of a combined Electrodialysis and Reverse Electrodialysis (RED) Desalination &Power Generation system-Theoretical study
There is an enormous potential for energy generation from the mixing of sea and river water at global estuaries. The estimated global energy potential from estuaries is 2.6 TW which is approximately 20% of the worldwide energy demand and more than the global electricity consumption. Reverse electrodialysis (RED) has been proposed as a method to extract this energy. This technology can convert the Gibbs free energy of mixing associated with High (HC) and Low Concentration (LC) solutions, into usable forms of energy (e.g., electricity or fuels). RED uses a series of selective ion exchange membranes (IEM) for ion transport during controlled mixing of saltwater and freshwater. A RED stack is comprised of a series of alternating Anion (AEM) and Cation Exchange Membranes (CEM). The AEM and CEM aid in separating altenating flow channels with HC and LC solutions. Here, we will focus on overall viability of the RED process for hydrogen and electricity generation from salinity gradients. We will determine the maximum available energy (exergy) that can be extracted from the system and losses (exergy destruction) during the process and the net extractable energy. The energy efficiency and exergy of the process will be evaluated for various numbers of cell pairs and the optimum operating conditions based on energy and exergy rates will be proposed.   Highly motivated students with strong theoretical background in Thermodynamics are welcome to contact Prof. Hatzell for further details. 
Heat Transfer, Combustion,
and Energy Systems
Credit 11/14/2016
Dr. Hatzell marta.hatzell@me.gatech.edu Multi-Membrane Electrochemical System for Electrical and Hydrogen Generation through Reverse Electrodialysis power generation-Experimental study
To date, much work in reverse electrodialysis (RED) has focused on utilizing a large number of membranes to spontaneously produce electrical power (galvanic approach). Here, we will evaluate the potential of membrane-based electrochemical systems in the electrolytic approach (electrolysis) and galvanic approach (reverse electrodialysis) for hydrogen and electricity generation. The trade-off between added ohmic resistances and Donnan potential by increasing the number of membranes will be investigated. The total energy extraction and energy efficiency of the system will be calculated under galvanic (spontaneous) and electrolytic (non-spontaneous) modes. Furthermore, we will investigate the potential for using the RED electrochemical system for hydrogen production through an electrolysis approach. The effects of sustained pH gradient across the cell will be compared with similar electrolytes to determine trends in power and energy density values. Highly motivated students interested in hands-on experiences and open for collaboration and team work are welcome to contact Prof. Hatzell for further details. 
Heat Transfer, Combustion,
and Energy Systems
Credit 11/14/2016
Dr. Comas Haynes Comas.Haynes@gtri.gatech.edu Applying Motion Control and Fluidics to Food Processing:
The goal of this project is to aid in characterizing a novel approach to food processing via ice slurry and/or liquid water chiller media, as well as alternative motion patterns to standard batch processing approaches. The undergraduate research assistant will empirically and semi-empirically aid the research team’s characterization of fluid mechanics during simulated food processing. Key to testing will be the design and investigation of alternative motion patterns with the intent to increase fluid shear/overall effectiveness of processing and specifically with regards to thermal and biological results. Core fluid mechanics knowledge alongside coding experience with an aptitude for learning new languages (BASIC) are required, as well as an appreciation for mechanism design and control systems. The project will combine both theoretical relationships alongside validation and experimentation given its applied research nature. 
Heat Transfer, Combustion,
and Energy Systems
Credit 8/7/2017
Dr. Lieuwen tim.lieuwen@aerospace.gatech.edu Clean Combustion
This research consists of theoretical and experimental work in clean combustion.  Opportunities are available for credit the first semester in the lab, and for credit or pay after that.
Heat Transfer, Combustion,
and Energy Systems
Credit 10/20/2015
Dr. S. Kumar satish.kumar@me.gatech.edu Modeling and Experimental Testing of Thermoelectric Coolers for Electronic Devices Heat Transfer, Combustion,
and Energy Systems
Credit 10/20/2015
Dr. S. Kumar satish.kumar@me.gatech.edu Modeling and Experimental Testing of Power Electronic Devices.
In this project, student will be either developing thermal model for power electronic devices or performing experiments to analyze electrical and thermal characteristics of these devices. The goal is to develop computational model to explore different options for the thermal management of power electronic devices. On the experimental side, the current-voltage characteristics and temperature rise of these devices need to be measured, analyzed and compared against the numerical results.
Heat Transfer, Combustion,
and Energy Systems
Credit 10/21/2015
Dr. Seueng Woo Lee seung.lee@me.gatech.edu This research will focus on designing electrochemical cells for advanced electrochemical energy storage and conversion systems.  Heat Transfer, Combustion,
and Energy Systems
Credit 10/20/2015
Dr. Yogi Joshi yogendra.joshi@me.gatech.edu This project is part of a student competition organized under the sponsorship of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). We have successfully demonstrated the concept of a novel Thermo-Hydraulic Connector for microelectronics assemblies in prior RevCon competitions held in 2012 and 2014. In both, the Georgia Tech thermo-hydraulic connector outperformed thermal resistance of an advanced commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) thermal connector, consistently demonstrating very low thermal resistance of 0.1 K/W. Our concept won the “Lowest Resistance” Design Award in 2012, and “Multidisciplinary Award” in 2014 at the DARPA/ONR Field-Reversible Thermal Connector (RevCon) Challenge.
 
For the 2015 RevCon competition, we are developing an entirely new thermo-hydraulic connector design, while retaining the same basic principle of the previous two entries. The connector incorporates major design refinements to address issues identified with our previous entries.  We are looking for a Senior to get involved in this student competition project on a part time basis in Fall 2015.  This appointment is for a paid position, nominally 10 hours per week.  The applicants must be able to work independently, have taken ME 3345, and have experience with CAD tools, machine shop, experimental techniques, and laboratory data acquisition software. Please send a CV to Dr. Joshi for consideration.
Heat Transfer, Combustion,
and Energy Systems
Pay 7/31/2015
Dr. Zinn zinn@gatech.edu Combustion Research
Combustion research related to improving the performance of energy generating and propulsion systems.
Heat Transfer, Combustion,
and Energy Systems
Credit 10/20/2015
Dr. Devesh Ranjan devesh.ranjan@me.gatech.edu Cryogenic Cameras
A facility at STAM Lab is interested in observing the structure of convective flow in a pressurized cryogenic nitrogen vessel.  The student researcher will conduct a survey of cameras and camera hardware that is suitable for submersion in cryogenic fluids. Probable solutions will be tested and compared.
Heat Transfer, Combustion,
and Energy Systems
Credit 8/1/2016
Dr. Devesh Ranjan devesh.ranjan@me.gatech.edu Natural convection in high-Prandtl fluids
Convection due to thermal forcing produces several flow patterns. This project will be aimed at observing and identifying these patterns in high viscosity fluids using a noninvasive photochromic flow visualization technique. The student will be involved in experiment planning, data collection, as well as development of pattern identification algorithms.
Heat Transfer, Combustion,
and Energy Systems
Credit 8/1/2016
Dr. Devesh Ranjan devesh.ranjan@me.gatech.edu Development of Laser-induced Fluorescence system for gas tunnel
Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) utilizes the fluorescent properties of certain chemicals, such as acetone, to visualize fluid mixing. By seeding one of the fluids with a flourescing substance, we can relate the intensity of fluoresced light to the concentration of the seeded fluid. This type of information can be invaluable when studying the dynamics of fluid mixing.

The Shock Tube and Advanced Mixing Lab (STAM Lab) gas tunnel studies the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI). This fluid instability manifests itself in all sorts of phenomenon, from salt domes to supernovae. Understanding RTI is vital for the success of the inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reaction. The gas tunnel collects valuable information about the development of RTI in extreme conditions that can be used to develop predicitve models for the ICF target.

The primary goal of this research opportunity is to perform introductory calculations and experiments to test the efficacy of LIF in the STAM Lab gas tunnel. The student will develop and fabricate a small gas tunnel and introductory LIF system.

Required Skills: Independent worker, CAD, Machining experience, ME 3322, ME 3340
Heat Transfer, Combustion,
and Energy Systems
Credit 8/1/2016
Dr. Devesh Ranjan devesh.ranjan@me.gatech.edu Slab Experiment
One of the interests of a variety of physical systems is studying the mixing of materials due to the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability and the ensuing turbulent behavior. Our facility desires to study this in a slab-like configuration. The slab will be a band of high density gas embedded in a low density gas inside the facility’s shock tube. The shock will interact with the two interfaces between high and low density gases and cause turbulent mixing. The student will be responsible for designing and manufacturing a part of the shock tube test section in order to form the slab into repeatable initial conditions.
Heat Transfer, Combustion,
and Energy Systems
Credit 8/1/2016
Dr. Devesh Ranjan devesh.ranjan@me.gatech.edu Stereo-PIV
The shock tube in STAM Lab collects simultaneous velocity and density measurements through coordinated PLIF and PIV of shock waves interacting with interfaces between gasses of differing densities at Mach 1.55 and varying angles of inclination. Our current configuration captures velocity data in only 2 dimensions. The student working on this experiment will assist in the development and implementation of Stereo-PIV, in which the third velocity dimension can be realized. The student will be involved in running experiments using the current 2D setup and data processing to gain an understanding of the diagnostic, and design and manufacturing of the new configuration. 
Heat Transfer, Combustion,
and Energy Systems
Credit 8/1/2016
Dr. S. Yee shannon.yee@me.gatech.edu Thermo-Electro-Chemical Cooling
We are developing a new type of cooling module that uses electrochemistry to create a cooling effect. This project entails working with a graduate student mentor on an aspect of this project. This could entail fabrication and assembly of the system module, detailed performance measurements, or calculations predicting/validating the performance of the module. 
Heat Transfer, Combustion,
and Energy Systems
Credit 3/16/2017
Dr. S. Yee shannon.yee@me.gatech.edu Thermoelectric Module Fabrication
We are developing a new type of thermoelectric cooling module that uses a new thermoelectric material. This project entails working with a graduate student mentor on an aspect of this project. This could entail fabrication of the thermoelectric module, detailed performance measurements of the module, or calculations predicting/validating the module performance. 
Heat Transfer, Combustion,
and Energy Systems
Credit 3/16/2017
Dr. S. Yee shannon.yee@me.gatech.edu Microscale Thermal Transport
We are developing a new thermal measurement technique that is capable of measuring the thermal transport of suspended microscale wires. This involves microfabrication of suspended structures and an accompanying measurement system. While an undergraduate researcher will probably not perform the microfabrication, the undergraduate research will work with a graduate student mentor on an aspect of the project. This could entail fabricating a part of the measurement apparatus and gathering and analyzing of data, 
Heat Transfer, Combustion,
and Energy Systems
Credit 3/16/2017
Dr. S. Yee shawngregory@gatech.edu 1. Conducting Polymer Synthesis and Processing
Seeking students to do basic synthesis and processing of conducting polymers. Must know organic chemistry and should feel comfortable working with chemicals. Most work will take place at Carbon-Neutral Energy Solutions building (CNES), located slightly away from campus. Preferred majors: MSE/CHEM/CHBE/ECE. 
Heat Transfer, Combustion,
and Energy Systems
Credit 11/13/2017
Dr. S. Yee shawngregory@gatech.edu 2. Lumber Functionalization for Hydrophobicity
Seeking students to use vapor deposition to make wood hydrophobic and then characterize properties. Must know basic chemistry. Most work will take place at the Love building. Preferred majors: MSE/CHEM/CHBE. 
Heat Transfer, Combustion,
and Energy Systems
Credit 11/13/2017
Dr. S. Yee shawngregory@gatech.edu 3. Infrared Spectrometer Apparatus Testing
Seeking students to use microelectronics to further develop small-scale infrared spectrometer for chemical analysis. Tasks include optimizing device, testing solutions, and developing algorithms. Most work will take place at Carbon-Neutral Energy Solutions building (CNES), located slightly away from campus. Preferred majors: MSE/CHEM/BME/ME/ECE. 
Heat Transfer, Combustion,
and Energy Systems
Credit 11/13/2017
Dr. S. Yee shawngregory@gatech.edu 4. Silicon Thermoelectric Testing Apparatus Development
Seeking students to develop a thermoelectric testing module which characterizes heat transfer and energy production/consumption. Must be proficient with solidworks and good with your hands/ machining. Most work will take place at Carbon-Neutral Energy Solutions building (CNES), located slightly away from campus. Preferred majors: ME. 
Heat Transfer, Combustion,
and Energy Systems
Credit 11/13/2017
Dr. M. Yoda minami@gatech.edu Image Processing of Colloidal Assembly in Microchannels
This project involves processing digital images of a flow of a liquid containing small (1 um or less in diameter) colloidal particles through a 30 um deep microchannel. Under certain conditions, the particles are attracted to the wall, and assemble into bands along the flow direction. The images of this flow (acquired by a very high-sensitivity electron-multiplying CCD camera) will be processed using existing MATLAB or C++ software to determine the properties of the bands. The project will also involve optimizing the image processing procedures.

Prerequisite course: ME 3340

Students must have familiarity with MATLAB programming and Excel. Some knowledge of C++ and the MATLAB Image Processing Toolbox desired, but not required. 
Fluid Mechanics Credit 11/1/2016
Dr. G.P. “Bud” Peterson
Dr. Bladimir Ramos-Alvarado
bra3@gatech.edu  Title: Design, analysis, and optimization of active-liquid cooling devices for high-power LEDs
Description: The objective of this project is to inspire the student to develop a new idea/concept for an active-liquid cooling device for the thermal management of high-power electronics and primarily for high-power LEDs. The design process will be carried out after a thorough review of the literature and the student will be highly encouraged to look for mimicking bio-inspired cooling methods. Secondly, the analysis portion will be carried out by means of CFD modelling of heat transfer and fluid flow. The optimization of the cooling device will be the last stage of the project. Manufacturing and experimental characterization will be the following stages of this project.
Required abilities: Ability to work independently. Completed ME 3322, 3340 and 3345.
Heat Transfer, Combustion,
and Energy Systems
Credit 12/1/2016
Dr. G.P. “Bud” Peterson
Dr. Bladimir Ramos-Alvarado
bra3@gatech.edu Characterization of the wettability of different surfaces by means of atomistic simulation
Description: The objective of this project is to conduct a series of classical molecular dynamics simulations of wettability of generic Lennard-Jones (LJ) systems. By performing droplet wettability simulations of several LJ systems, it is sought to gain a deeper understanding of the wettability phenomenon of different crystalline materials. The atomistic simulations will be complemented with a robust theoretical analysis in order to derive a wettability theory able to readily predict the macroscopic contact angle of a given surface.
Required abilities: Ability to work independently. Completed ME 3322, 3340 and 3345. Have a special taste for some applied physics.
Heat Transfer, Combustion,
and Energy Systems
Credit 3/16/2017
Dr. D. Hu tspencer6@gatech.edu Biomimicry of moth antennae filter
Moths are reported to use their antennae to sense a mate up to 4 kilometers away. This phenomenal "smelling" ability has been shown to be a consequence of how the pheromone particles flow onto the unique and intricate structure of the moth’s antennae. This project aims to use insights gleaned from analyzing the moth antennae in order to create a more efficient filter that can be used for chemical sensing and/or cleaning the air you breathe. The ideal candidate would be a Junior or Senior with some fluid dynamics knowledge and previous independent research experience. If interested, please send your resume to Thomas Spencer at tspencer6@gatech.edu to apply.
Fluid Mechanics Credit 3/27/2017
Dr. D. Hu tspencer6@gatech.edu Biomimicry of animal noses with rapid prototyping
Sniffing is an important component in mammalian olfaction, serving to draw odors into the nose for detection. However, not much is currently known about the rates at which different animals sniff. It is hypothesized that the sniffing flow rate increases the total smelling abilities of animals. This project aims to test that hypothesis by measuring the sniffing frequency and flow rates of different animals at the Atlanta Zoo then creating a mimic of these noses to mimic the results in the lab. The ideal candidate would be a Junior or Senior with the ability to effectively communicate to zoo officials and a method of transportation. If interested, please send your resume to Thomas Spencer at tspencer6@gatech.edu to apply.
Fluid Mechanics Credit 3/27/2017
Manufacturing      
Faculty Advisor E-mail Project Description      
Dr. J. Colton jcolton@gatech.edu Humanitarian design and engineering projects that assist developing countries with global development.  
Examples of organizations: WHO, State Department, USAID, NGOs
Manufacturing Credit 10/20/2015
Dr. J. Colton jcolton@gatech.edu Design and fabrication of aerospace composite parts for Boeing Corp. 
Structural and manufacturing considerations.
Manufacturing Credit 10/20/2015
Dr. Kalaitzidou kyriaki.kalaitzidou@me.gatech.edu Manufacturing of composites for automotive applications and characterization of their mechanical properties Manufacturing Pay or Credit 10/20/2015
Dr. C. Saldana christopher.saldana@me.gatech.edu The project is focused on developing manufacturing processes for lightweight materials.
Activities include: (1) fabrication of 3D lightweight lattices using additive manufacturing, (2) use of x-ray computed tomography to study defects in these materials and (3) use of loading platforms to study how lightweight lattices respond to mechanical loads. Students will gain familiarity with additive manufacturing, non-destructive evaluation, and device fabrication
Manufacturing Credit 3/29/2016
Dr. T. Harris tequila.harris@me.gatech.edu Implementing a manufacturing process to make thin film for fuel cells and characterizing the resulting film to establish correlations between the processing and electrochemical performance.  Manufacturing Pay or Credit 11/28/2016
Dr. T. Harris tequila.harris@me.gatech.edu Implementing a manufacturing process to make thin film for water filtration and desalination and characterizing the resulting film to establish correlations between the processing and filtration. Manufacturing Credit 11/28/2016
Dr. T. Harris tequila.harris@me.gatech.edu Designing and implementing a mechanism to quickly and precisely stop and restart fluid flow during roll-to-roll processing of thin film, which can be integrated into an existing slot die coater Manufacturing Credit 11/28/2016
Dr. T. Harris tequila.harris@me.gatech.edu Studying fluid flow dynamics towards the advancement of extruding or coating thin film gradients and/or multiple line or pattern coating Manufacturing Credit 11/28/2016
Dr. T. Harris tequila.harris@me.gatech.edu Studying particle flow dynamics during the extrusion process. Manufacturing Credit 11/28/2016
Dr. T. Harris tequila.harris@me.gatech.edu Designing and building a dual slot die system to reduce cost and increase processing speed for the manufacture of bilayer thin film.  This work would be guided by computational analysis. Manufacturing Credit 11/28/2016
Mechanics of Materials      
Faculty Advisor E-mail Project Description      
Dr. Bassiri-Gharb nazanin.bassirigharb@me.gatech.edu The Smart Materials' Advanced Research & Technology (SMART) Laboratory focuses on micro/nanoscale complex oxide materials for micro and nano electromechanical systems (MEMS/NEMS).
Project: Our group has recently acquired a state-of-the-art National Instruments PXIe system (see configuration here: http://ohm.ni.com/advisors/retrieve?id=PX5292796 ) for a project combining wideband waveform generation/acquisition and scanning probe microscopy for advanced electro-chemo-mechanical characterization of oxide materials. We are looking for a couple of undergraduate students satisfying the requirements below for a project involving the setup and operation of the above tool. The project consists of the three phases below:
1) Design: The student will contribute to the overall design of the standalone NI-PXIe system, in particular instrument interface and data format.
2) Engineering: The student will work on the implementation in LabVIEW for wideband waveform generation, acquisition and processing - implementing the latest-and-greatest multidimensional scanning probe microscopy techniques (Band Excitation, Full Data Acquisition, etc).
3) Science: Following extensive training on an Asylum Research MFP-3D atomic force microscope, the student will benchmark the NI-PXIe system by characterizing the electromechanical response of industry-relevant oxide materials.

Requirements:
- Significant experience with LabVIEW.
- Intuition of analytical mechanics (simple harmonic oscillators, beams, driven oscillators)
- Interest or potential interest in materials and MEMS research, particularly functional oxides and ferroelectric materials.

Optional requirements:
- Familiarity with electronics (op-amps, transimpedance amplifiers, power electronics, etc)
- Knowledge of digital signal processing
- Knowledge of big data analytics and machine learning (ICA, PCA, NMF, etc)
Mechanics of Materials Credit 8/17/2017
Dr. K. Kalaitzidou kyriaki.kalaitzidou@me.gatech.edu Manufacturing of lightweight carbon fiber polymer composites. Research is for credit unless the student has prior research experience Mechanics of Materials Credit 8/18/2017
Dr. K. Kalaitzidou kyriaki.kalaitzidou@me.gatech.edu Mechanical testing of polymer composites. Research is for credit unless the student has prior research experience Mechanics of Materials Credit 8/18/2017
Dr. S. Kalidindi surya.kalidindi@me.gatech.edu The MINED research group aims to design and launch a modern, data-centered, materials innovation cyber-ecosystem that can dramatically lower the cost and time expended in the successful deployment of new and improved materials in high performance commercial products.
Ongoing research projects aim to accomplish this ambitious goal through innovations in high throughput multimodal measurement strategies, multiscale modelling strategies, and modern data science/analytics strategies, all of which will be singularly focused on hierarchical materials (exhibiting multiple length/structure scales). We have multiple opportunities for undergraduate students to get involved in our ongoing projects. Students with diverse skillsets or interest in acquiring a broad diverse set of skills are welcome to contact Professor Kalidindi to explore specific opportunities. 
Mechanics of Materials Pay or Credit 3/16/2017
Dr. R. Neu richard.neu@me.gatech.edu Varous projects that involve linking microstructure of materials to their mechanical properties through microscopy, experiments in the Mechanical Properties Research Lab, and computational modeling.  Projects include fatigue or corrosion experiments to support the development of life prediction models for hot section components in combustion turbines (e.g., jet engines, natural gas power generators) and for high strength aluminum alloys. Mechanics of Materials Pay or Credit 10/20/2015
Dr. J. Qi qih@me.gatech.edu 3D printing of materials with controllable residual stress. In this project, we will design and fabricate a low profile tensile deformation stage that can fit into a 3D printer. This stage can apply a tensile load during the operation of the 3D primer. we will then characterize the residual stress that can be developed in the printed material. Mechanics of Materials Credit 8/14/2014
Dr. J. Qi qih@me.gatech.edu 3D printing of active structures. We will design and print active structures using a state-of-the-art of 3D printer through structure design and system integration. The long term goal is to to 3D print an active machine that can sense and respond to environment. Credit. Mechanics of Materials Credit 8/14/2014
Dr. J. Qi qih@me.gatech.edu Carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites, with a combination of an excellent specific strength, size stability and durability, enjoy a large array of applications in daily life and industry. 3D printing of such mechanically strong components is highly desirable to satisfy the demand of high-tech application for aerospace and automotive structures with high design flexibility. The conventional 3D printed composites is based on thermoplastics using short fiber or particles as reinforcement. These 3D printed composites usually show poor mechanical properties compared to composites manufactured by conventional methods using continuous fibers. 3D printing of continuous fibers reinforced thermosets composites is expected show excellent mechanical properties, which is still a big challenge. We will use direct-ink-write based printing of the two-stage curing epoxy resin accompanied with an out-nozzle impregnation of continuous carbon fiber to achieve 3D printing of high-performance CFRP. Mechanics of Materials Credit 8/23/2017
Dr. C. Saldana christopher.saldana@me.gatech.edu The project is focused on developing a new loading platform for in situ x-ray tomography analysis. Activities include: (1) design and fabrication of a thermo-mechanical loading platform for in situ x-ray analysis, (2) calibration of the platform to study thermal and mechanical deformations in complex materials and (3) development of Matlab routines for analysis of the measurement data. Students will gain familiarity with in situ x-ray tomography, hands-on fabrication of experimental setups and Matlab-based coding analysis. Mechanics of Materials Credit 3/29/2016
Dr. Matthew McDowell mattmcdowell@gatech.edu Build a gas-flow furnace system for the controlled growth of nanostructured materials.
This furnace will include a vacuum system and inlets for inert gases, and it will be controlled with a custom LabVIEW interface. The synthesized materials will be used in electrochemical energy devices. Experience with machining and LabVIEW is desired.
Mechanics of Materials Credit 10/20/2015
Dr. Matthew McDowell mattmcdowell@gatech.edu Understand the mechanical degradation of multicomponent battery materials during charge and discharge.
In this project, the student will work closely with a graduate student.  The results could lead to design guidelines for longer-lasting batteries. Work will include synthesis of materials and fabricating/testing battery cells
Mechanics of Materials Credit 10/20/2015
Dr. Michael Varenberg varenberg@gatech.edu Building of 4 test rigs to be used in teaching tribology lab for hands-on studying of (1) dry sliding friction, (2) abrasive wear, (3) adhesive wear, and (4) fretting wear.
The projects will include design, manufacturing, assembling, building the PC-based machine-user interface, and testing. Test rigs to be built will consist of electric motor, transmission, moving stage, measuring unit (load cell, proximity probe, etc.) and loading unit. Each project can be done by a group of two students. Expected skills are knowledge of CAD and familiarity with LabVIEW.
Tribology Pay or Credit 10/20/2015
Micro and Nano Engineering      
Faculty Advisor E-mail Project Description      
Dr. Bassiri-Gharb nazanin.bassirigharb@me.gatech.edu The Smart Materials' Advanced Research & Technology (SMART) Laboratory focuses on micro/nanoscale complex oxide materials for micro and nano electromechanical systems (MEMS/NEMS).
Project: Our group has recently acquired a state-of-the-art National Instruments PXIe system (see configuration here: http://ohm.ni.com/advisors/retrieve?id=PX5292796 ) for a project combining wideband waveform generation/acquisition and scanning probe microscopy for advanced electro-chemo-mechanical characterization of oxide materials. We are looking for a couple of undergraduate students satisfying the requirements below for a project involving the setup and operation of the above tool. The project consists of the three phases below:
1) Design: The student will contribute to the overall design of the standalone NI-PXIe system, in particular instrument interface and data format.
2) Engineering: The student will work on the implementation in LabVIEW for wideband waveform generation, acquisition and processing - implementing the latest-and-greatest multidimensional scanning probe microscopy techniques (Band Excitation, Full Data Acquisition, etc).
3) Science: Following extensive training on an Asylum Research MFP-3D atomic force microscope, the student will benchmark the NI-PXIe system by characterizing the electromechanical response of industry-relevant oxide materials.

Requirements:
- Significant experience with LabVIEW.
- Intuition of analytical mechanics (simple harmonic oscillators, beams, driven oscillators)
- Interest or potential interest in materials and MEMS research, particularly functional oxides and ferroelectric materials.

Optional requirements:
- Familiarity with electronics (op-amps, transimpedance amplifiers, power electronics, etc)
- Knowledge of digital signal processing
- Knowledge of big data analytics and machine learning (ICA, PCA, NMF, etc)
Mechanics of Materials Credit 8/17/2017
Dr. P. Hesketh peter.hesketh@me.gatech.edu Measurements of the composition of gases with a MEMS microbridge thermal conductivity sensor.
For example testing for He, methane and CO2 in nitrogen and air.
Micro and Nano engineering Pay or Credit 7/31/2015
Dr. P. Hesketh peter.hesketh@me.gatech.edu Developing a thin film coating process for miniature GC columns with MOF nanocrystal.
Will be used for detection of volatile organic compounds.
Micro and Nano engineering Pay or Credit 7/31/2015
Dr. P. Hesketh peter.hesketh@me.gatech.edu The goal of this project is to characterise the performance of ultra low power microcantilever chemical vapor nanosensors.
These sensors have nanoporous material coatings which provide selective adsorption of volatile organic compounds. The detection of volatile organic compounds in the atmospher is of growing concern for air quality and also management of building air recirculation to optimize energy use.
Micro and Nano engineering Pay or Credit 7/31/2015
Dr. P. Hesketh peter.hesketh@me.gatech.edu Microfluidic Cilia
Microfluidic device for pre-concentration and separation of bacteria from a sample of food, for example leafy greens. Use of functionalized magnetic beads in a channel with magnetically actuated cilia to produce fluid mixing a low Reynolds number. Study the magnetic field needed and flow conditions for highest probability of capture.
Micro and Nano engineering Credit 3/29/2016
Dr. Hailong Chen hailong.chen@me.gatech.edu Development of novel electrode materials for sodium ion batteries
The project focuses design, synthesis, electrochemical testing and in situ characterization of novel materials that can be used as anode and cathode in sodium ion batteries. Sodium ion battery is an emerging energy storage technology that are expected to replace current lithium ion batteries. Students will be trained on hands-on chemical synthesis, coin cell battery assembly and testing and crystal structure characterization, as well as data analysis. The research is interdisciplinary. ME students with interest or background in chemistry and materials science are especially encouraged to apply. Students in chemistry, chemical engineering and materials science having background in design and instrumentation are also welcome.  Please send CV directly to Prof. Hailong Chen.
Micro and Nano engineering Credit 10/20/2015
Dr. Hailong Chen hailong.chen@me.gatech.edu Development of novel recycling technology for spend lithium ion batteries
We are in progress of developing a novel technology to recycle valuable materials and elements from spent lithium ion batteries. Lithium ion batteries are widely used as power sources in smart phones, laptops as well as in high power tools and electric cars. Tremendous amount of lithium ion batteries are being produced and used every day. However, high efficiency, low cost and environment friendly recycling technology for spent lithium ion batteries is not yet developed and is very much desired. Student will be trained to work with artificial battery materials as well as real battery materials collected from new and used lithium ion batteries, provided by industrial partners such as General Motors. Students with background in environment engineering, chemical engineering and industrial system engineering are especially welcome to apply. Please send CV directly to Prof. Hailong Chen.
Micro and Nano engineering Credit 10/20/2015
Dr. Sulchek todd.sulchek@me.gatech.edu Measuring bacterial adhesion using atomic force microscopy. Will work closely with a consumer products company. Skills: controls, microscopy, experimental testing, matlab, bacterial cell culture. Micro and Nano engineering Credit 8/23/2017
Dr. Sulchek todd.sulchek@me.gatech.edu Mapping nanoscale energy landscapes using atomic force microscopy. Skills: controls, matlab, microscopy, experimental testing, machine learning, fpga programming. Micro and Nano engineering Credit 8/23/2017
Dr. Sulchek todd.sulchek@me.gatech.edu Automated cell labeling: Create a liquid handling robot to perform routine biological assays including labeling cells with antibodies. Skills: cell culturing, controls, machining, microfluidics, biochemistry, fluorescent microscopy.  Micro and Nano engineering Credit 8/23/2017
Dr. Sulchek todd.sulchek@me.gatech.edu Microfluidic cell separation by stiffness. Create a reliable holder for a microfluidic chip that can efficiently process cells with minimal failure. Skills: microfluidics, machining, CAD, automation, microscopy.  Micro and Nano engineering Credit 8/23/2017